Cape Arago Audubon Society, Coos County, Oregon

We have four ongoing projects in the community:

Coquille Valley Wildlife Area - Bird Blind and Bench

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission approved a land acquisition that will add 95 acres to the Coquille Valley Wildlife Area in Coos County. The wildlife area provides wetland habitat for wildlife and outdoor recreation opportunities. The Nature Conservancy is providing funds to acquire the property.

Cape Arago Audubon Society is involved with the new Coquille Valley Wildlife Area. The Chapter hopes to build a bird blind ΒΌ mile off the road to deter vandalism. The blind would allow scoping of waterfowl and other bird species on the Area. The chapter also hope to purchase, install and dedicate a bench near the blind in memory of long-time Society member Rick Foster.

Pony Creek Community-Based Habitat Restoration

Launched in 2006, this is a long-term, ongoing partnership with the property owner (North Bend School District), US BLM (our source for loaner tools), Coos Watershed Association, South Coast Business Employment Corporation (SCBEC), and others. Through the Stop Oregon Litter and Vandalism (SOLV) "Adopt-a-River" program, CAAS adopted the lower reach of Pony Creek, along the high school and middle school playing fields and bordered by Pony Creek Road, and we have been working to clean up and replant the area ever since.

For 2013 updates and a little history, read more...


Millicoma Marsh Community Adopter

CAAS is a "community adopter" of Millicoma Marsh in coordination with the Millicoma Marsh Stewardship Group. Not only a favorite dog-walking area, the marsh is also a birding hot spot, with prime sparrow habitat, plus many other species, including ducks, raptors, and shorebirds, to be seen at various times of the year. Read more...

North Spit (Proposed) Shorebird Sanctuary

The 270-acre Weyerhaeuser property on the North Spit of Coos Bay, which was used for treatment of wastewater from the mill that Weyerhaeuser shut down in 1996, has since re-vegetated and turned into high-value habitat, particularly for migratory shorebirds in the fall. In 2008, CAAS worked with a consultant to study the site and document its habitat and recreational values. Read more...